Applying Theoretical Interventions for Clients Experiencing Life Transition and Developmental Issues, Part II

​Applying Theoretical Interventions for Clients Experiencing Life Transition and Developmental Issues, Part II
​Applying Theoretical Interventions for Clients Experiencing Life Transition and Developmental Issues, Part II
 
Marriage, couple, and family counselors have varying caseloads. What they all have in common is that their group of clients—whether large or small—represents the variety of human experience. Even those counselors with a specific clinical focus see variety in the ways in which specific issues manifest in different relationships. Part of the goal of your counseling program is to expose you to varying scenarios so that when you are faced with differing client situations, you will have the evidence-based research knowledge, flexibility, analytical skills, and theory-integration practice to know the best course of action to take with a particular couple or family.
To prepare for this Application Assignment, select and view one movie from the list provided in this week’s Learning Resources. Begin to conceptualize the couple’s or family’s problem through your theoretical orientation and identify interventions that you might use. Finally, begin to locate articles in the Walden Library that could be used to justify the interventions you selected.
The assignment (2–3 pages)

Identify the movie you selected and the life transition/developmental issue present in the couple/family.
Conceptualize the couple’s/family’s problem through your chosen theoretical orientation.
Describe two interventions you would use to address these couple/family issues and how you would use them. (Note: The interventions may not emerge from your chosen theoretical orientation.)
Justify the intervention you selected with two evidence-based research articles.

 
You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes.
Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages.
Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor.
The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.