Fluid restriction is often required in the management of congestive heart failure (CHF). A typical..

Fluid restriction is often required in the management of
congestive heart failure (CHF). A typical fluid “prescription” is 30 mL/kg body
weight/day. Suppose that one of your older relatives suffers from CHF and asks
you to help figure out a day’s worth of beverages. (In this example, we will
ignore the water content of foods, although many dietitians include foods when
calculating the fluid intake of seriously ill patients.) Your relative weighs
168 lb and enjoys drinking milk, orange juice, and plain water. In order to
calculate how many fluid ounces are permitted each day, you will first
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Fluid restriction is often required in the management of
congestive heart failure (CHF). A typical fluid “prescription” is 30 mL/kg body
weight/day. Suppose that one of your older relatives suffers from CHF and asks
you to help figure out a day’s worth of beverages. (In this example, we will
ignore the water content of foods, although many dietitians include foods when
calculating the fluid intake of seriously ill patients.) Your relative weighs
168 lb and enjoys drinking milk, orange juice, and plain water. In order to
calculate how many fluid ounces are permitted each day, you will first need to
convert body weight from pounds to kilograms:

168 lb ÷ 2.2 lb/kg = 76.4 kg

Next, multiply the fluid allowance of 30 mL/kg by body
weight:

30 mL/kg × 76.4 kg = 2,292 mLFinally, convert mL to fluid
ounces. There are roughly 30 mL/fl. oz:

2,292 mL ÷ 30 mL/fl. oz = around 76 fl. Oz

Your relative could drink 12 fl. oz of milk, 8 fl. oz of
orange juice, and 56 fl. oz of water or other beverages. Here is a similar
problem for you to solve: a young woman is restricted to 25 mL/kg body
weight/day. She weighs 122 lb. How much total fluid (in fluid ounces) is she
allowed to drink each day?

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