week 4 responses baber makayla

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Week 4 response
 

 

DQ 1

 

 Guided Response: Review your classmates’ posts, and respond to at least two of your peers with an analysis of how they have considered incorporating the iPad into a lesson plan.   Are there additional iPad applications that you would recommend to your classmates?  

 

 

 

The following apps are used with students’ with high incident disability such as autism, cerebral palsy, and down syndrome. The IPad Book Creator gives kids the opportunity to flex their creative muscles, author their own stories and export their masterpieces directly to iBooks. The very intuitive interface makes it easy for kids of all ages and stages of development to follow along and it provides a sense of autonomy for building any kind of book imaginable. iComm may be for you. iComm lets you load picture and audio and record your own voices. Ideal for children with autism, cerebral palsy, apraxia and down syndrome. Preference and reinforcement assessment touch designed for students’ with autism. This app is geared more towards professionals and parents running a preference assessment, but can greatly impact the course of treatment for the child. The app features different assessments, assessment tools and also automatically calculates the results of the testing itself to give the caregiver the information needed to determine the best course of action. Mautone claims, it is “the best app to assess potential reinforcers and is very easy-to-use.”  The apps that are used with the IPad are great to use in the classroom because it gives a voice to students’ that have trouble with communication. By allowing students’ with autism and other high incident disabilities to use the IPad and specific apps they now have the opportunity to learn new concepts and communicate their feelings and level of understanding. I would incorporate such apps into my lesson by including the app as a part of the lesson. During the lesson I would express concepts that may be used in collaboration with the app that the impaired student is using. It is important that the impaired student be included from the beginning to the end of the lesson and the IPad apps allow for this to occur.

 

 

 

Autism and Learning

 

One app designed to work on an IPad for children with Autism is called Rufus Robot. “Rufus Robot is a research based app” (Gastgeb, 2014, para. 4).  It is a highly effective app that offers students with autism or other learning disability the ability to express feelings and emotions as well as play learning games.  The app actually teaches students about “facial expressions and emtions” (Gastgeb, 2014, para. 6).  It also teaches numbers and counting, groups and categories and can be downloaded for almost any IPad device.

 

Another great app for IPads that helps students with autism is Autistic language learning (ALL) is another tool that was developed by a speech/language pathologist and it “helps to keep kids engaged while improving their verbal language and understanding” (Autistic Langage learning, nd, para. 1).  This series of applications is also widely used by students with Down syndrome with much success.  The software focuses on actions and yes/no questions with much success.

 

Finally, a third useful app for the IPad is called “Buzoo” and it is touch-free, with simple intuitive hand-gestures that allows the child to collect zoo characters.  It is a great physical learning opportunity.  The objective is to “help each animal board the bus, learn to recognize each one, how to spell its name, interact with each animal, listen to each animal’s story, and more! All, without the need to hold, touch, or fine-point” *(Autism Speaks Inc., 2015, para. 4).

 

Describe an example of how you might incorporate a tool like the iPad into a lesson plan for a class to include students with a high incident disability.  I would know what each of the apps could do so I would write some lesson plans to include the use of the iPad that can be used by groups of students.  I would let them get into groups and then have them follow along on the iPad. 

 

References:

 

Gastgeb, H., (2014). Welcome to the home of rufus robot! Retrieved from http://rufusrobot.com/

 

Autistic Language Learning, (nd). Autistic language learning. Retrieved from http://autismlanguagelearning.net/

 

Autism Speaks Inc., (2015). A buzoo story. Retrieved from http://www.autismspeaks.org/autism-apps/buzoo-story

 

 

 

 

DQ 2

 

Guided Response: Choose two peers who have posted a different perspective than you.  Compare and contrast your views with those of your peers, citing pros and cons from each perspective. Support your points with at least one scholarly source that is cited and referenced according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.  Review the first device choice, and support your peers’ AT selections by explaining additional ways they can be incorporated in a full inclusion class. What recommendations would you make to your classmates about helping students to use assistive technology to access the general curriculum?

 

person

 

A – The first place I would visit would be any websites consisting any information about the use of assistive technology against disabilities.

 

 

 

B – I would implement the IPAD into the classroom first because it has many applications that can be used against disabilities that affects a student’s performance in the classroom such as autism.

 

 

 

C – The school’s responsibility for a student’s assistive technology is for the school to be able to provide for each student that are needed.

 

 

 

D – I can customize the assistive technology to the liking of the student in which the student is able to use the assistive technological device without any problems and will be able to learn while using this device.

2) person

After reviewing the Assistive Technology:  An Overview, I found that Ms. Adelaide was faced with some difficult challenges.  Ms. Adelaide has received a student with a learning disability and an IEP that accommodates is disability with the use of AT.  The student is knowledgeable with the AT equipment but Ms. Adelaide is not.  The first place I would seek to learn more about the AT would be his IEP.  Here I could find what AT is used to aide him and how it is expected to be used in the class.  I then would follow up with an internet source of the AT equipment being used to define its capabilities and uses.  I would also “Seek support from knowledgeable individuals (e.g., information technology specialist, other educators, family members).  Use Websites, blogs, and listservs to find helpful answers to questions or to find out how others have successfully implemented AT in the classroom” (n.d.  2014).  The first device I would seek to learn more about to implement in my classroom would be the already existing technology already existing in the classroom and school.  The reason I would do this would be that I would already be familiar with the devices and could further my capabilities by adding downloadable apps that could assist learning in my class.  The schools responsibility for AT are defined by law.  Although it has been proven that most schools are not implementing the AT devices stated to be used for students with disabilities and or IEP’s. This leaves the AT devices misused and misunderstood, causing the students to still struggle.  As a teacher I could help students fully succeed in their use of assistive technology by continuing my own education with the different AT devices available for use.  I could request administration for professional development that would teach and guide teachers on the use of AT.  I would also reach out to other faculty members for collaboration to write grants to receive funds to purchase additional AT devices.  Through these methods I could help provide AT in the general curriculum.

 

Reference

 

The IRIS Center.  (n.d.).  Assistive technology: An overview [Module].  Retrieved from http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/at/chalcycle.htm